Archive for the ‘Water Pollution’ Category

Ready, Set, CLEANUP!

Monday, September 9th, 2013



YOU can personally thank the ocean on September 21! Join California’s largest volunteer event with thousands of ocean lovers at the California Coastal Cleanup. Can one day make a difference for a clean ocean and coast? Find out as Eben Schwartz, Marine Debris Program Manager with the California Coastal Commission, tells us about Coastal Cleanup Day. It’s one of the easiest and most rewarding volunteer efforts you can join.

Everyday Action: Clean up your act! Thank the ocean and join the cleanup team September 21. Go to http://www.coastal.ca.gov/publiced/ccd/ccd.html. You’ll have fun and make a difference!

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Should We Fear Red Tides?

Monday, July 22nd, 2013



Why did your grandfather tell you to only eat shellfish during months that contained an “r”? This advice that we now know to be myth, comes from the fear of contaminated shellfish from harmful algal blooms (HABs). We talk with Dr. Rafael Kudela, UCSC Biological and Satellite Oceanography Laboratory. Find out why HAB’s are harmful to both humans and marine life and how climate change may be making “blooms” of this toxic algae more common!

Everyday Action: Report HABs (red tides) or other unusual marine sightings when you see one. Report marine mammal and seabird strandings as they may be associated with a HAB.

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Tsunami Debris Hits California

Monday, June 10th, 2013



UPDATE! Debris from the March 2011 Japan tsunami is making its way across the ocean and landing along the West Coast. Most recently, the first confirmed debris from the earthquake washed up along California’s north coast. We interviewed Sherry Lippiatt, California Regional Coordinator of the NOAA Marine Debris Program, to get the most updated information on the status of this debris, its impacts to the California coastline, and how you can get involved and make a difference.

Everyday Action: Reduce single use packaging with a little effort: carry reusable bags, use your own coffee and water containers, and purchase in bulk when possible.

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San Clemente Dam Removal

Monday, January 7th, 2013



Since 1921, the Carmel River and its wildlife resources have been impacted by San Clemente Dam. As a result, the Carmel River suffers accelerated erosion, the once vibrant steelhead run has dramatically decreased, and lives and property below the dam are threatened with potential collapse of the dam — which has been deemed unsafe by the State of California. We speak with Sam Schuchat, Executive Officer, State Coastal Conservancy. He discusses an extraordinary opportunity to remove the antiquated dam through a unique example of public and private interests working together to realize benefits far beyond what either could achieve working alone.

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Rain Garden: Slowing Pollution at Its Source

Monday, November 26th, 2012



In spring 2012, the City of Elk Grove, a community just south of Sacramento, California, opened a rain garden that is a magnet for wildlife, prevents pollution from running off into local streams, and an important tool to teach others about how use similar earth-friendly techniques in their own yard. Paul Mewton, Chief of Planning, Cosumnes Community Services District, and Greg Gearheart, State Water Resources Control Board, discuss this innovative park and how land use in the Central Valley still impacts our coast and ocean.

California Coastal Cleanup

Monday, September 10th, 2012



Saturday, September 15 is the Annual California Coastal Cleanup Day, the state’s largest volunteer event. In 2011, nearly 72,000 volunteers removed more than 1.3 million pounds of trash and recyclables from California beaches, lakes and waterways. For this year, debris from the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami is bringing more attention to the important issue of marine debris. Eben Schwartz, marine debris program manager for the California Coastal Commission, talks about the 28th annual cleanup and how you can participate. (Photo credit: California Coastal Commission)

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Pacific Gyre

Monday, March 26th, 2012



The Pacific Gyre is a slowly moving, clockwise spiral of ocean currents. We talked with Marcus Eriksen, the executive director of the 5 Gyres Institute, about ocean gyres and the Pacific Garbage Patch, said to be twice the size of Texas, floating between Hawaii and California. (Photo courtesy of NOAA Marine Debris Program)

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Japan Tsunami Marine Debris

Monday, February 6th, 2012



On March 11, 2011, a powerful tsunami hit Japan, destroying cities and villages, and carrying tons of debris out to sea. Ocean currents are projected to carry some of that debris to U.S. shores, including the West Coast. It’s uncertain what is still floating, where it’s located, where it will go, and when it will arrive. Nir Barnea, West Coast Regional Director, NOAA Marine Debris Program, has the latest information.

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Thanks for the Beautiful Beaches!

Monday, May 23rd, 2011



With Memorial Day Weekend, the “unofficial” start of summer, we highlight ways to thank the ocean for our beautiful beaches. Brian Baird, Assistant Secretary for Ocean and Coastal Policy for the California Natural Resources Agency, discusses everyday actions we can take to help clean up our coasts and ocean. Actor and activist Edward James Olmos adds his powerful Thank You Ocean message, “Don’t Trash the Beach.”

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Decommissioning Oil and Gas Rigs

Monday, June 21st, 2010



Platform Irene, North of Point Arguello: Linda SnookSkyli McAfee, Executive Director of the California Ocean Science Trust, offers a perspective on decommissioning oil and gas rigs that sit off the coast of California. (Photo credit: Platform Irene, North of Point Arguello: Linda Snook)

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